PERSONAL SAFETY TIPS

Body Language: If you look and act like an easy target, then you could be an easy target! Your body language (facial expressions, eye movements, positions of the body, arms and hands) is a nonverbal form of communicating feelings, intentions or thoughts. Appear to be in charge of your actions. Keep your head up and your eyes scanning the area; you will likely see who is near and what they are doing.

Situational awareness: Be aware of your surroundings. Have a mindset that allows you to notice potential threat scenarios in time to react accordingly. Some scenarios are riskier than others, such as returning to a parked car. Raise your level of awareness. 

Fight back: If you are attacked, fight back and try to run away. Scream and yell; make a scene; attract attention. Do what you can to get free and move immediately towards safety.

Keep your car keys on your night table. Most key fobs have a panic button. If you suspect your house is being broken in to, press the panic button (and call 911). The noise from the horn honking could scare away a burglar.

Do not have your home address entered into your car GPS. If your car is stolen, the thief can use this information to find your house and potentially even open your garage door.


WILDLIFE SAFETY

In most situations, people and wildlife can coexist. The key is to respect the wildness of wildlife. Most dangerous and potentially harmful encounters occur because people fail to leave the animals alone. Wildlife should not be harassed, captured, domesticated or fed. Intentional or inadvertent feeding is the major cause of most wildlife problems, and it is illegal to feed deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, pronghorn, and elk in Colorado.

Bears

Today, bears are sharing space with a growing human population. Curious, intelligent, and very resourceful, black bears will explore all possible food sources. If they find food near homes in our community, they’ll come back for more. Most conflicts between people and bears can be traced to easy-to-get-at human food, garbage, pet food, bird seed or other attractants. When people allow bears to find food, a bear’s natural drive to eat can overcome its wariness of humans. Bears can easily damage property, vehicles, and homes. Bears that become aggressive in their pursuit of a meal must often be destroyed. Every time a bear must be destroyed, it’s not just the bear that loses. We all lose a little piece of the wildness that makes Colorado, and Genesee, so special. Please do your part to keep bears wild!

Don’t inadvertently provide food for bears:

  • Much of what people throw away smells like food to a hungry bear. Standard metal or plastic trash cans won’t keep out bears. Once bears learn where it’s easy to get at the garbage, they’ll come back again and again. Never leave trash or recyclables out overnight. Empty cans and boxes still smell like food. One study showed that simply putting trash out only on the morning of pick up cuts the chances of a bear visit from 70% to 2%.
  • Don’t let your bird feeder become a bear feeder. Bird seed is often the first reward a bear gets for exploring human places. Consider using bird feeders only when bears are hibernating. If you do use your bird feeders year-round, hang them at least 10 feet off the ground (or 10 feet higher than the bear can climb).

What to do if you see a bear:

  • Realize that bears don’t attack humans unless they feel threatened. Bears will generally back away or climb a tree when they encounter humans. You never want to block potential escape routes for a bear.
  • If you see bear around your house, scare it away by making noise (yelling, clapping your hands, banging pots, air horn, etc.) from a location inside your house. It is in the bear’s best interest that it not feel comfortable around homes and populated areas.
  • If you see a bear at a distance, leave it alone and make noise as you leave.
  • If you surprise a bear, stand still, stay calm and talk in a normal voice as you slowly back away. If you’re on a trail, step off on the downhill side. Be sure the bear has a clear escape route that you are not blocking.
  • If a bear approaches you, never turn your back and run. Look big and back away slowly.
  • If attacked, fight back. Convince the bear that you are not worth the trouble.

For more information: Colorado Parks + Wildlife has a number of short videos about bears: what to do if you see one; how to bear proof your home, as well as others.

Mountain Lions

While mountain lions (and bobcats) have been sighted in Genesee, they are generally calm, quiet, and elusive. They tend to live in remote, rocky areas where deer and elk are plentiful. Such conditions exist here in Genesee. Most dangerous encounters occur because people fail to leave wildlife alone! Do not attempt to feed, approach, or harass wildlife!

If you encounter a mountain lion or bobcat:

  • Do not approach a lion, especially one that is feeding or with kittens. Most mountain lions will try to avoid a confrontation. Give them a way to escape.
  • Stay calm when you come upon a lion. Talk calmly and firmly to it. Move slowly.
  • Stop or back away slowly, if you can do it safely. Running may stimulate a lion's instinct to chase and attack. Face the lion and stand upright.
  • Do all you can to appear larger. Raise your arms. Open your jacket if you're wearing one. If you have small children with you, protect them by picking them up so they won't panic and run.
  • If the lion behaves aggressively, throw stones, branches or whatever you can get your hands on without crouching down or turning your back. Wave your arms slowly and speak firmly. What you want to do is convince the lion you are not prey and that you may in fact be a danger to the lion.
  • Fight back if a lion attacks you. Lions have been driven away by prey that fights back. People have successfully fought back with rocks, sticks, caps or jackets, garden tools and their bare hands. Remain standing or try to get back up!
  • More Information

Coyotes

All Front Range communities are home to coyotes. These clever canids have readily adapted to our food and habitat-rich environments. Coyotes have adjusted very well to human-disturbed environments, and now thrive in close proximity to people. Coyotes are active year-round and become more visible during their breeding season, which occurs from February through March. Coyotes can be seen throughout the day but are especially active at dawn and dusk. Opportunistic hunters, coyotes will prey on small mammals and domestic pets. They have been known to attack pets and approach people too closely. We can coexist with coyotes by following a few basic guidelines.

  • Never feed coyotes!

  • Remove attractants from your yard, including pet food, water sources, and bird feeders.
  • Secure trash in a container with a locking lid or put trash out on the morning of pick up.
  • Always supervise your pet when outside, especially at dawn and dusk.
  • Never leave cats or dogs outside after dark.
  • If you must leave your pet outside, secure it in a fully enclosed kennel.

If a coyote approaches you:

  • Yell, throw rocks or sticks at it, spray it with a hose, and make noise.
  • Do not run or turn your back.
  • Be as big and loud as possible.
  • Face the coyote and back away slowly.
  • If attacked, fight back.
  • More information

Foxes

Red fox are beautiful animals and can make for an enjoyable wildlife viewing experience. There are genetic variations resulting in four recognized colors: red, cross, silver and black. Red fox are not pets, and they should not be approached, fed, harassed, captured, or domesticated. The same guidelines apply to red fox as those for coyotes. Store all garbage in wildlife-proof containers; and when possible keep your pets indoors.

Deer and Elk

Deer and elk are common sights in our open space meadows. It is important to keep a safe distance as they can become aggressive. Juvenile deer, elk and other wildlife may look vulnerable or in danger, but their mother is likely nearby. Approaching, handling, or feeding young animals may do more harm than good. Please do not pick up or "rescue" young wildlife.
*If you are concerned about unusual wildlife behavior, report it to the Jefferson County Sheriff's nonemergency number at 303.277.0211.

Dogs

Animal control legislation is in effect for essentially one reason: to encourage responsible pet ownership. Animal control laws protect the public health and safety, and keep owners from allowing their animals to be a nuisance to their neighbors. These same laws protect the animals from cruel treatment, neglect and injury. All dogs residing in Jefferson County, including Genesee, must be licensed annually. 

Leash Your Dog When Off Your Property. All dogs much be on a leash or confined on its owners’ premises at all times. This means your dog must be on a leash when on any Genesee Foundation property, including Open Space, Genesee trails, county roads, private drives, and recreational areas and fields.

Control Your Dog’s Nuisance Barking. Bothersome/nuisance barking is a common problem in Genesee. While many people consider barking to be a normal behavior, excessive barking is a behavioral problem and is often a sign your dog is stressed. Jefferson County animal control regulations states that it is the dog owner’s responsibility to find out what is causing the problem and to take measures to stop the dog’s annoying barking. Do not ignore your dog’s barking. The best watchdog is quiet until it needs to sound an alarm if a real intruder is present.

Clean Up After Your Dog. Dog waste poses serious health risks to people, pets, and especially children. Dog waste doesn’t just wash away or disappear. It sticks around for a long time and makes its way into our water supplies. Plus, it looks and smells disgusting! Because we feed our dogs food that’s processed and very different from the food wild animals eat, dog waste does not biodegrade quickly like wild animal waste. Considering the large number of pets in Genesee, this hardy dog waste accumulates!

Genesee has made it easy to dispose of pet waste in the numerous containers along its roads. Please always pick up after your dog, wherever you walk. Not doing so is a fineable offense.